Aviation meteorology

Description

Understand aviation meteorology to deal with the impact of weather on air traffic management (ATM). Understand how thorough changes in pressure and temperature values at airports can create variations in head and tail-wind components, and may impose low visibility operating conditions. Knowledge of aviation meteorology can help to reduce negative impact on the ATM system by diminishing disruption and the consequent problems of disturbed flow rates, lost capacity and induced additional costs.

Alternative labels

impact of climatic conditions on air traffic management
study of aviation climatic conditions
aspects of aviation meteorology
study of aviation weather conditions
impact of weather on air traffic management
impact of weather conditions on aviation
principles of aviation meteorology
meteorology for aviation
aviation meteorology features
aviation meteorology principles
impact of climatic conditions on aviation

Skill type

knowledge

Skill reusability level

sector-specific

Relationships with occupations

Essential knowledge

Aviation meteorology is an essential knowledge of the following occupations:

Air traffic controller: Air traffic controllers assist pilots by providing information concerning the height, speed and course. They assist pilots in order to facilitate a safe take off and landing of aircrafts. They are responsible for maintaining a secure and orderly movement of aircraft along major air routes up in the sky and around airports. They control air traffic in and within vicinity of airports according to established procedures and policies to prevent collisions and to minimise delays arising from traffic congestion.
Air traffic instructor: Air traffic instructors train people in all the matters regarding with the operations in air navigation services such as the management of flight traffic and the communication for navigation in aerodromes. They teach all the directives issued by air traffic control for the purpose of passing to trainees the sense of safety and expeditious flow of air traffic.
Helicopter pilot: Helicopter pilots fly helicopters in order to transport passengers and cargo from one place to another. They plan flights using aeronautical charts and navigation instruments. Prior to departure, they inspect helicopters following checklists to detect leaking hydraulic fluid, inoperative control, low fuel level, or other unsafe conditions.
Airline transport pilot: Airline transport pilots fly large aircrafts with a maximum take-off weight of more than 5700 kilograms, to transport passengers, mail, or freight on long or short-haul flights for leisure, business or commercial purposes. They have the overall responsibility for the safe and efficient operation of aircrafts and the safety of crew and passengers.
Commercial pilot: Commercial pilots navigate flight of fixed-wing and multi-engine aircrafts for the transport of passengers and cargo.
Flight test engineer: Flight test engineers work with other systems engineers to plan the tests in detail and to make sure that the recording systems are installed for the required data parameters. They analyse the data collected during test flights and produce reports for individual test phases and for the final flight test. They are also responsible for the safety of the test operations.
Aircraft dispatcher: Aircraft dispatchers authorise, regulate, and control commercial airline flights according to governmental and company regulations. They expedite and ensure flight flow by preparing logs of flights, delays, cancellations, and changes in schedules or flight plans.
Co-pilot: Co-pilots are responsible for assisting captains by monitoring the flight instruments, handling radio communications, watching for air traffic, and taking over for the pilot as needed. They adhere to the pilot’s commands, flight plans, and regulations and procedures of aviation national authorities, companies, and airports.
Private pilot: Private pilots operate non-commercial airplanes for leisure with a limited amount of seats and engine horsepower. They also provide private transport for people.
Air force pilot: Air force pilots operate aircrafts in combat missions, patrol missions, or search and rescue missions. They ensure aircraft maintenance, and communicate with air force bases and other vessels to ensure safety and efficiency in operations.
Second officer: Second officers are responsible for monitoring and controlling various aircraft systems including fixed-wing and rotary wing. They work in close coordination with the two pilots during all phases of flight. They make pre-flight, inflight, and post flight inspections, adjustments, and minor repairs. They verify parameters such as passenger and cargo distribution, the amount of fuel, aircraft performance, and appropriate engine speed according to instructions of pilots.

Optional knowledge

Aviation meteorology is optional for these occupations. This means knowing this knowledge may be an asset for career advancement if you are in one of these occupations.

Air traffic safety technician: Air traffic safety technicians provide technical support regarding the safety of air traffic control and navigation systems. They design, maintain, install and operate these systems both in the airport and on board the aeroplane according to regulations.
Intelligence communications interceptor: Intelligence communications interceptors work in the air force in the development of intelligence in places like headquarters and command posts. They search and intercept electromagnetic traffic transmitted in different languages.
Climatologist: Climatologists study the average change in weather and climate from a long-term perspective. They research and analyse historic weather conditions in order to forecast climatic conditions trends such as changes in temperature, global warming, or regional evolutive weather conditions. They use these findings for advising on environmental policy, construction, agricultural projects, and societal matters.
Industrial engineer: Industrial engineers design a vast array of production systems aiming to present efficient and effective solutions. They integrate a varied number of variables such as workers, technology, ergonomics, production flows, and product specifications for the design and implementation of production systems. They can specify and design for microsystems as well.
Aircraft pilot: Aircraft pilots control and navigate aircraft. They operate the mechanical and electrical systems of the aircraft and transport people, mail and freight.
Flight instructor: Flight instructors train both new and experienced pilots seeking to gain licences or experience in flying new aircraft, how to properly operate an aircraft according to regulations. They teach their students both the theory and practice of how to optimally fly and maintain an airplane, and they observe and evaluate student technique. They also focus on the regulations relating to operational and safety procedures specific to different (commercial) airline aircraft.
Airspace manager: Airspace managers control activities aimed at developing the European airspace into a continuum that is flexible and reactive to changes of users’ needs in airspace. They aim to optimise the network capacity and improve the performance.
Air force officer: Air force officers specialise in flying or ground duties, and supervise a team of air force personnel. They coordinate their team’s training and welfare, and perform duties specific to their area of specialisation.
Aeronautical information specialist: Aeronautical information specialists provide high quality aeronautical information management services through technological means. They provide support to senior aeronautical information specialists and assess changes in aeronautical information affecting charts and other products. They answer requests of aeronautical data needs for airway companies operational groups and systems.

 


 

References

  1. Aviation meteorology – ESCO

 

Last updated on September 20, 2022

Thinking about your next career move?

Answer a few questions about your jobs and education, and we’ll give you suggestions about your best possible career move. It’s completely free!