Art-historical values

Description

The historical and artistic values implied in examples of one’s branch of art.

Alternative labels

art-historical value
historical value
historical and artistic qualities
art value

Skill type

knowledge

Skill reusability level

sector-specific

Relationships with occupations

Essential knowledge

Art-historical values is an essential knowledge of the following occupations:

Choreographer: Choreographers create sequences of movements in which motion, form or both are specified. Some choreographers also take up the role of coordinating, teaching and rehearsing performers in the production of the choreography. They can also act as a movement coach for actors.
Art studies lecturer: Art studies lecturers are subject professors, teachers, or lecturers who instruct students who have obtained an upper secondary education diploma in their own specialised field of study, art studies, which is predominantly academic in nature. They work with their university research assistants and university teaching assistants for the preparation of lectures and of exams, grading papers and exams and leading review and feedback sessions for the students. They also conduct academic research in their field of arts studies, publish their findings and liaise with other university colleagues.
Exhibition curator: Exhibition curators organise and display artworks and artefacts. They work in and for museums, art galleries, museums for science or history, libraries and archives, and in other cultural institutions. In general, exhibition curators work in artistic and cultural exhibition fields and events of all kinds.
Choreologist: Choreologists are specialised creators of dance in specific styles or traditions, such as ethnic dance, early dance or baroque dance. Their work is contextualised historically and sociologically as an expression of the human group that developed it. Choreologists analyse dance from intrinsic aspects: theory, practice and epistemology of movements in itself. They also study dance from the extrinsic perspective: the social, ethnological, etnographical and sociological context in which dance is developed.
Museum director: Museum directors oversee the management of the art collections, artefacts, and exposition facilities. They secure and sell works of art on the one hand, and strive to preserve and maintain the art collection of a museum on the other hand. Moreover, they also manage finances, employees, and marketing efforts of the museum.
Artistic director: Artistic directors are in charge of the programme of an artistic project or a cultural organisation. They are responsible for the strategic vision, the visibility and the quality of all kind of artistic activities and services such as theatre and dance companies. Artistic directors also manage staff, finances and policies.
Assistant stage director: Assistant stage directors support the needs of the stage director and the production for each assigned stage production, and serve as a liaison between performers, theatre staff and stage directors. They take notes, provide feedback, coordinate the rehearsal schedule, take blocking, rehearse or review scenes, prepare or distribute actor notes, and facilitate communication between designers, production staff, and stage director.

Optional knowledge

Art-historical values is optional for these occupations. This means knowing this knowledge may be an asset for career advancement if you are in one of these occupations.

Venue programmer: Venue programmers are in charge of the artistic programme of a venue (theatres, cultural centers, concert halls etc.) or of temporary settings (festivals). They follow artistic trends and up-coming artists, keep in contact with bookers and agents to build a consistent programme and encourage artistic creation. All of this happens within the boundaries of the artistic and financial scope of the organisation they are involved in. 
 
Conservator: Conservators organise and valorise works of art, buildings, books and furniture. They work in a wide range of areas such as creating and implementing new collections of art, preserving heritage buildings by applying restoration techniques as well as foreseeing the conservation of literary works, films, and valuable objects.
Collection manager: Collection managers ensure the care and preservation of objects within cultural institutions, like museums, libraries, and archives. Collection managers, along with exhibition curators, and conservators, play a very important role in collections care. They can be found in most large museums.
Choirmaster/choirmistress: Choirmasters/choirmistresses manage various aspects of the vocal, and sometimes instrumental, performances of musical groups, such as choirs, ensembles, or glee clubs.
Personal property appraiser: Personal property appraisers undertake detailed analysis and investigation of personal items such as books, wine, arts and antiques in order to determine their value for sales and insurance purposes. They assess the value of the items, taking into account the age, current condition, quality and if any repairs are required. Personal property appraisers prepare appraisal reports.

 


 

References

  1. Art-historical values – ESCO

 

Last updated on September 20, 2022

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