Global Maritime Distress and Safety System

Description

The internationally agreed-upon set of safety procedures, types of equipment and communication protocols used to increase safety and make it easier to rescue distressed ships, boats and aircraft.

It performs searching and rescue activities and coordination, provides safety information and general radio communications.

Alternative labels

features of GMDSS
protocols for Global Maritime Distress and Safety System
equipment used in Global Maritime Distress and Safety System
coverage of Global Maritime Distress and Safety System
scope of GMDSS
scope of Global Maritime Distress and Safety System
equipment used in GMDSS
features of Global Maritime Distress and Safety System
protocols for GMDSS
coverage of GMDSS

Skill type

knowledge

Skill reusability level

cross-sector

Relationships with occupations

Essential knowledge

Global Maritime Distress and Safety System is an essential knowledge of the following occupations:

Maritime instructor: Maritime instructors teach all those occupationally piloting a boat or a ship, such as skippers and ship captains, how to operate their inland water boats or maritime ships according to regulations. They teach their students theory and techniques on how to optimally pilot, steer and navigate, and maintain their specific boat or ship, observe and evaluate the students’ practice. They also focus on non-steering related subjects such as customer service (in case of person transportation) and safety measure regulations.
Fisheries boatman: Fisheries boatmen operate small boats inshore and near the coast only. They organise, manage and execute shipping activities on deck and with engines. Fisheries boatmen capture and conserve fish or engage in aquaculture operations. They respect the safety conditions and comply with national and international regulations.
Aquaculture cage mooring worker: Aquaculture cage mooring workers operate highly-specialised equipment in order to moor cages in stable stations, drifting cages or even self-propelled and semi-submerged cages. 
Marine surveyor: Marine surveyors inspect vessels intended for operations in maritime or open sea waters. They ensure that vessels and equipment follow the regulations laid down by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO). They may also act as third parties for the review of offshore facilities and construction projects.
Ordinary seaman: Ordinary seamen occupy the lowest rank of a maritime ship’s deck crew. They comprise the main labour force on board a boat where they help to operate the ship. They are supervised by the ship captain and the engineer, and can be given instructions by any individuals ranked above them.
Sailor: Sailors assist the ship captain and any crew higher in hierarchy to operate ships. They dust and wax furniture and polish wood trim, sweep floors and decks, and polish brass and other metal parts. They inspect, repair, and maintain sails and rigging, and paint or varnish surfaces. They make emergency repairs to the auxiliary engine. Sailors may stow supplies and equipment and record data in log, such as weather conditions and distance travelled. 
Ship duty engineer: Ship duty engineers share responsibility for most of the content of the ship’s hull. They ensure operation of the main engines, steering mechanism, electrical generation and other major subsystems. They communicate with the ship chief engineer to perform technical operations.
Ship assistant engineer: Ship assistant engineers assist the ship chief engineer and the ship duty engineer in the operations of the ship’s hull. They support the operation of the main engines, steering mechanism, electrical generation and other major subsystems. They communicate with maritime engineers about the performance of technical operations. They also ensure appropriate safety and regulatory standards compliance and are able to take on higher level positions if needed.
Fisheries master: Fisheries masters plan, manage and execute the activities of fishing vessels inshore, coastal and offshore waters. They direct and control the navigation. Fisheries masters can operate on ships of 500 gross tonnage or more. They control the loading, unloading and stevedoring, as well as the collection, handling, processing and preservation of fishing.
Marine chief engineer: Marine chief engineers are responsible for the entire technical operations of the vessel including engineering, electrical, and mechanical divisions. They are the head of the entire engine department aboard the ship. They have overall responsibility for all technical operations and equipment on-board the ship. Marine chief engineers collaborate on security, survival and health care on board, observe the national and international standards of application.
Deck officer: Deck officers or mates perform the watch duties on board of vessels like determining the course and speed, manoeuvring to avoid hazards, and continuously monitoring the vessels position using charts and navigational aids. They maintain logs and other records tracking the ship’s movements. They ensure that the proper procedures and safety practices are followed, check that equipment is in good working order, and oversee the loading and discharging of cargo or passengers. They supervise crew members engaged in maintenance and the primary upkeep of the vessel.
Ship captain: Ship captains are in charge of a vessel for the transportation of goods and passengers, operating in offshore and coastal waters. The size of the vessel can range from a small vessel to a cruise liner depending on the tonnage that they are certified to sail. Ship captains have vast experience with ships and their operation, and are likely to have worked their way through the ranks of other ship-related positions.
Fisheries boatmaster: Fisheries boatmasters operate fishing vessels in coastal waters performing operations at the deck and engine. They control the navigation as well as capture and conservation of fish within the established boundaries in compliance with national and international regulations.

Optional knowledge

Global Maritime Distress and Safety System is optional for these occupations. This means knowing this knowledge may be an asset for career advancement if you are in one of these occupations.

Fisheries deckhand: Fisheries deckhands work on fishing vessels where they carry out fishing related activities. They undertake a wide range of fishing and maritime work on land and at sea, such as handling of fishing gears and catches, communications, supply, seamanship, hospitality and stores.
Deep-sea fishery worker: Deep-sea fishery workers operate on board fishing vessels to catch deep-sea fish for sale or delivery. They use equipment such as rods and nets to catch deep-sea fish according to legislation. Deep-sea fishery workers also transport, handle and preserve fish by salting, icing or freezing them.
Boatswain: Boatswains organise the crew on deck and at the fishing hold to execute the orders received from a superior. They coordinate the operations of maintenance, manoeuvres, assembly and repair of fishing gear and sorting, processing and preserving of the catches while observing the hygienic standards and established safety regulations.
Fisheries refrigeration engineer: Fisheries refrigeration engineers perform maintenance and repair machines and equipment in the fish hold and refrigeration system on board of fishing vessels.
Mechanical engineer: Mechanical engineers research, plan and design mechanical products and systems and supervise the fabrication, operation, application, installation and repair of systems and products. They research and analyse data.
Fisheries assistant engineer: Fisheries assistant engineers assist the marine chief engineer with checking operations and maintenance of the propulsion plant, machinery and auxiliary equipment of the ship. They collaborate on security, survival and health care on board, observing the national and international standards of application.
Vocational teacher: Vocational teachers instruct students in their specialised field of study, which is predominantly practical in nature. They provide theoretical instruction in service of the practical skills and techniques that the students must subsequently master in the specialised vocation of their choice and aid in the development of the according attitudes and values. Vocational teachers monitor the students progress, assist individually when necessary, and evaluate their knowledge and performance on the subject through assignments, tests and examinations.
Maritime water transport general manager: Maritime water transport general managers coordinate the administrative activities that go with the management of vessels in the context of maritime water transport. They prepare vessels, check availability, liaise with clients, manage budgets, and oversee operations from an economic standpoint, following regulation for maritime operations.
Marine engineer: Marine engineers design, build, maintain and repair the hull, mechanical, electronic equipment and auxiliary systems such as engines, pumps, heating, ventilation, generator sets. They work on all types of boats from pleasure crafts to naval vessels, including submarines.

 


 

References

  1. Global Maritime Distress and Safety System – ESCO

 

Last updated on September 20, 2022

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