Manage artistic project

Description

Manage an artistic project. Determine project needs. Establish partnerships. Manage the budget, schedule, contractual agreements and assess the project.

Alternative labels

coordinate art projects
direct artistic projects
manage art projects
manage an artistic project

Skill type

skill/competence

Skill reusability level

sector-specific

Relationships with skills

Essential skill

Manage artistic project is essential to master the following skills:

Identify necessary human resources

Relationships with occupations

Essential skill

Manage artistic project is an essential skill of the following occupations:

Performance production manager: Performance production managers take care of a range of practical issues concerning the production. They deal with matters ranging from the recruitment of staff, procurement of materials and services, to freight, customs coordination, telecommunications, labor relations, logistics, information technology, government liaison, venue booking, scheduling, operations management, mending delay problems and workplace safety.
Circus artist: Circus artists develop original performance pieces showcasing great artistic and performing skills, emotive depth and artistic proposals for the general public. Alone, or collectively, they may perform one or more traditional or original circus disciplines, which are usually based on physical capabilities such as strength, balance, agility, flexibility, ability and coordination of body parts, and combined with performance disciplines such as dance, theatre, mime etc. The physical nature of the exercises performed often includes a certain level of risk for the performer.  

Optional skill

Manage artistic project is optional for these occupations. This means knowing this skill may be an asset for career advancement if you are in one of these occupations.

Dance répétiteur: Dance répétiteurs assist conductors and choreographers in directing rehearsals and guiding the artists in the rehearsal process. Regardless of their nature and scope, a répétiteur’s actions are, from an ethical and practical standpoint, based on a commitment to respect the integrity of the work.
Dancer: Dancers interpret ideas, feelings, stories or characters for audiences by using movement and body language mostly accompanied by music. This normally involves interpreting the work of a choreographer or a traditional repertory, although it may sometimes require improvisation.
Choreographer: Choreographers create sequences of movements in which motion, form or both are specified. Some choreographers also take up the role of coordinating, teaching and rehearsing performers in the production of the choreography. They can also act as a movement coach for actors.
Puppeteer: Puppeteers perform shows by manipulating puppets such as hand puppets or marionettes. Their performance is based on a script and the movements of the puppets have to be synchronised with the speech and music. Puppeteers may write their own scripts and design and create their own puppets.
Coppersmith: Coppersmiths craft and repair items made of non-ferrous metals such as copper, brass and similar materials. They shape and form the raw materials into objects of practical or artistic purpose using smithing tools. Professional coppersmiths create detailed and highly technical devices using appropriate smithing techniques.
Community artist: Community artists research, plan, organise and lead artistic activities for people brought together by a shared interest, capacity, environment or condition. They manage and coordinate creative projects with local groups and individuals to foster their artistic creativity and improve their quality of life. Community artists make the arts accessible to the community they work for, and provide opportunities for participants to shape their artistic programme.
Artistic coach:
Artistic coaches research, plan, organise and lead arts activities for sport practitioners in order to provide them with artistic abilities such as dance, acting, expression and transmission that are important for their sport performance. Artistic coaches make technical, performatic or artistic abilities accessible to sports practitioners with the goal of improving their sport performance.

Cultural facilities manager: Cultural facilities managers direct the operations of facilities that provide cultural services such as theatre, movies and music. They plan and organise the daily operations of the related staff and facilities and ensure the organisation follows the latest developments in its field. They coordinate the different departments of the facility and manage the correct use of resources, policies and budgets.
Singer: Singers are professional musicians, skilled in the use of their voice as a musical instrument, with different vocal ranges. They perform for live audiences and for recordings in different musical genres.
Conceptual artist: Conceptual artists have the capacity to choose any material as an artistic tool or/and material to express a creative concept to be presented as an artistic experience to the public. Their work, belonging to the fine arts, can be two-dimensional (drawing, painting, collage), three-dimensional (sculpture, installation) or four-dimensional (moving images, performance).
Performance artist: Performance artists create a performance which can be any situation that involves four basic elements: time, space, the performer’s body, or presence in a medium, and a relationship between the performer and audience or onlookers. It can either be scripted or spontaneous, with or without audience participation. The performance can be live or via media. Performance art can happen anywhere, in any venue or setting and for any length of time.
Circus arts teacher: Circus arts teachers instruct students in a recreational context in the various circus techniques and acts such as trapeze acts, juggling, mime, acrobatics, hooping, tightrope walking, object manipulation, unicycling tricks, etc. They provide students with a notion of circus history and repertoire, but mainly focus on a practice-based approach in their courses, in which they assist students in experimenting with and mastering different circus techniques, styles and acts and encourage them to develop their own style. They cast, direct and produce circus performances, and coordinate the technical production and possible set, props and costume usage on stage.
Choreologist: Choreologists are specialised creators of dance in specific styles or traditions, such as ethnic dance, early dance or baroque dance. Their work is contextualised historically and sociologically as an expression of the human group that developed it. Choreologists analyse dance from intrinsic aspects: theory, practice and epistemology of movements in itself. They also study dance from the extrinsic perspective: the social, ethnological, etnographical and sociological context in which dance is developed.
Répétiteur: Répétiteurs accompany performers, usually singers, following the instructions of musical conductors in directing rehearsals and guiding the artists in the rehearsal process.
Fight director: Fight directors coach performers to safely execute fight sequences. They direct fights for performances such as dance, movies and television, circus, variety, and others. Fight directors may have a background in sports such as fencing, shooting or boxing, martial arts such as judo, wushu or karate, or military training.
Musician: Musicians perform a vocal or musical part that can be recorded or played for an audience. They have know-how and practice of one or many instruments or using their voice. The musician can also write and transcribe music.

 


 

References

  1. Manage artistic project – ESCO

 

Last updated on September 21, 2022

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