Negotiate land access

Description

Negotiate with landowners, tenants, mineral rights owners, regulatory bodies or other stakeholders to obtain permission to access areas of interest for exploration or sampling.

Alternative labels

negotiation of access to minerals with landowners
negotiate access to minerals with landowners
negotiation of land access
land access negotiation
negotiating access to minerals with landowners
negotiating of access to minerals with landowners
minerals access negotiation with landowners
negotiating land access
negotiating of land access

Skill type

skill/competence

Skill reusability level

sector-specific

Relationships with occupations

Essential skill

Negotiate land access is an essential skill of the following occupations:

Exploration geologist: Exploration geologists examine and prospect for mineral deposits. They identify, define and obtain legal title to an economically viable mineral deposit.  They are responsible for design, management and execution of the exploration programme.
 

Optional skill

Negotiate land access is optional for these occupations. This means knowing this skill may be an asset for career advancement if you are in one of these occupations.

Mine surveyor: Mine surveyors prepare and maintain mining plans in line with statutory and management requirements. They keep records of the physical progress of mining operations and of ore or mineral production.
Mine geologist: Mine geologists locate, identify, quantify and classify mineral resources and their geological characteristics and structure. They provide advice to mine managers and engineers at existing and prospective mineral operations.
Hydrogeologist: Hydrogeologists in mining study the distribution, quality and flow of water in order to keep mine workings free of nuisance water and to ensure an adequate supply of process water. They supply and evaluate information which will protect ground and surface water from contamination.
Environmental geologist: Environmental geologists study how mineral operations may impact the composition and physical characteristics of the earth and its resources. They provide advice on issues such as land reclamation and environmental pollution.
Property developer: Property developers buy land, finance deals, order construction projects and orchestrate the process of development. They purchase a tract of land, decide on a marketing strategy, and develop the building program. Developers must also obtain legal approval and financing. When the project is finished, they may lease, manage, or sell the property.
Conservation scientist: Conservation scientists manage the quality of specific forests, parks and other natural resources. They protect the wildlife habitat, biodiversity, scenic value, and other unique attributes of preserves and conservation lands. Conservation scientists perform field work.
Geotechnician: Geotechnicians collect and process rock and soil samples for geomechanical testing. They also describe the quality of rock mass, including structure, discontinuities, colour and weathering. Mine geotechnicians may measure the size of underground openings. They report the collected information to geologists and engineers as required.
Geology technician: Geology technicians assist in all the activities carried out by geologists. They, under the supervision of geologists, collect materials, carry out research and study the samples collected from the Earth in order to offer analysis as part of the project and the aim. Geology technicians assist in determining the value of the land for oil or gas exploration. They perform various technical tasks, including collecting samples during geochemical surveys, working on drill sites, and participating in geophysical surveys and geological studies.

 


 

References

  1. Negotiate land access – ESCO

 

Last updated on September 20, 2022