Business loans

Description

Loans which are intended for business purposes and which can either be secured or unsecured depending on whether a collatoral is involved. The different types of business loans such as bank loans, mezzanine finance, asset-based finance, and invoice finance.

Alternative labels

business mortgage
business allowance
firm loans
business investment
enterprise loans
company loans

Skill type

knowledge

Skill reusability level

cross-sector

Relationships with occupations

Essential knowledge

Business loans is an essential knowledge of the following occupations:

Bankruptcy trustee: Bankruptcy trustees administer a client’s bankruptcy case, investigate legal documentation for fraud possibilities and manage the money received from the sale of non-exempt property so as to distribute it to the owed creditors.
Insurance underwriter: Insurance underwriters assess business risks and liability policies and make decisions about commercial property. They inspect the conditions of businesses’ properties, analyse inspection policies, assist with real estate and rent issues, prepare loan contracts and handle commercial risks in order to align them with business practices. Insurance underwriters analyse various information from prospective customers in order to assess the likelihood that they will report a claim. They work to minimise risk for the insurance company and make sure that the insurance premium aligns with the associated risks. They can be specialists in life insurance, health insurance, reinsurance, commercial insurance, mortgage insurance.

Optional knowledge

Business loans is optional for these occupations. This means knowing this knowledge may be an asset for career advancement if you are in one of these occupations.

Actuarial consultant: Actuarial consultants analyse, manage and provide guidance on financial impact of risks. They can work in fields related to insurance, pension, investment, banking, healthcare etc. Actuarial consultants apply technical and statistical models and theories to give strategic, commercial, and financial advice.
Branch manager: Branch managers are responsible for the management of all the affairs related with a company in a specific geographic region or business branch. They receive indications from the headquarters, and depending on the structure of the company, they aim to implement the strategy of the company while adapting it to the market where the branch operates. They envision management of employees, communications, marketing efforts, and follow up to results and objectives.
Mergers and acquisitions analyst: Mergers and acquisitions analysts oversee the execution of transactions for the purchase, sale, merger or takeover of companies. They negotiate and complete the deal on the client’s behalf, by working closely with lawyers and accountants. Mergers and acquisitions analysts conduct operational and legal risk assessments of a company, assess comparable companies in the market and help with the post-merger integration.
Credit adviser: Credit advisers offer guidance to customers related to credit services. They assess the customer’s financial situation and debt issues arisen from credit cards, medical bills and car loans in order to identify optimal credit solutions for customers and also provide debt elimination plans to adjust their finances if needed. They prepare qualitative credit analyses and decision-making material in respect of defined customers in conformity with the bank’s strategy on credit policy, ensure the credit quality and follow up on the performance of the credit portfolio. Credit advisers also have expertise in debt management and credit consolidation.
Financial planner: Financial planners assist people dealing with various personal financial issues. They are specialised in financial planning, such as retirement planning, investment planning, risk management and insurance planning, and tax planning. They advise a strategy tailored to the client’s needs. They ensure the accuracy of bank and other financial records while maintaining a customer-orientated approach and following ethical standards.
Corporate investment banker: Corporate investment bankers offer strategic advice on financial services to companies and other institutions. They ensure that legal regulations are being followed by their clients in their efforts of raising any capital. They provide technical expertise and information on mergers and acquisitions, bonds and shares, privatisations and reorganisation, raising capital and security underwriting, including equity and debt markets.
Financial manager: Financial managers handle all the matters in reference to the finance and investments of a company. They manage financial operations of companies such as the assets, liabilities, equity and cash flow aiming to maintain the financial health of the company and operative viability. Financial managers evaluate the strategic plans of the company in financial terms, maintain transparent financial operations for taxation and auditing bodies, and create the financial statements of the company at the end of the fiscal year.
Credit manager: Credit managers oversee the application of credit policy in the bank. They decide the credit limits to be imposed, the reasonable levels of risk accepted and the conditions and terms of payment made to the customers. They control the collection of payments from their customers and manage the credit department of a bank.
Mortgage broker: Mortgage brokers handle mortgage loan applications from clients, collect loan documentation and search for new mortgage lending opportunities. They complete and close mortgage loan processes for their clients.
Credit union manager: Credit union managers oversee and manage member services, supervise staff and operations of credit unions. They inform staff about the latest credit union procedures and policies and prepare financial reports.
Investor relations manager: Investor relations managers disseminate the investment strategy of the company and monitor the reactions of the investment community towards it. They use marketing, financial, communications, and security law expertise to ensure transparent communication to the larger community. They respond to inquiries from shareholders and investors in relation to the company’s financial stability, stocks, or corporate policies.
Business manager: Business managers are responsible for setting the objectives of the business unit of a company, creating a plan for the operations, and facilitating the achievement of the objectives and implementation of the plan together with employees of the segment and stakeholders. They keep an overview of the business, understand detailed information of the business unit and support the department, and make decisions based on the information at hand.
Bank manager: Bank managers oversee the management of one or several bank activities. They set policies which promote safe banking operations, ensure the economic, social and commercial targets are met and that all the bank departments, activities and commercial policies are in compliance with legal requirements. They also manage employees and maintain an effective working relationship among the staff.
Loan officer: Loan officers assess and authorise the approval of loan applications for individuals and businesses. They ensure complete transactions between loan organisations, borrowers, and sellers. Loan officers are specialists in consumer, mortgage, or commercial lending.
Department manager: Department managers are responsible for the operations of a certain division or department of a company. They ensure objectives and goals are reached and manage employees.
Investment fund manager: Investment fund managers implement and monitor the investment strategy of a fund. They manage the fund’s portfolio trading activities and supervise the financial, securities, and investment analysts in charge to perform research on the investments and then make buying and selling recommendations. They make decisions on when to buy or sell the assets included in a portfolio. This manager works in a variety of settings such as banks, companies and stockbroking companies; working closely with the investment analyst. This occupation manages strategy and does not always work with relations between shareholders or investors.
Relationship banking manager: Relationship banking managers retain and expand existing and prospective customer relationships. They use cross-selling techniques to advise and sell various banking and financial products and services to customers. They also manage the total relationship with customers and are responsible for optimising business results and customer satisfaction.

 


 

References

  1. Business loans – ESCO

 

Last updated on September 20, 2022

Thinking about your next career move?

Answer a few questions about your jobs and education, and we’ll give you suggestions about your best possible career move. It’s completely free!