Marine electronics technician

Description

Marine electronics technicians lay out, install and repair electronic systems and equipment in vessels. They assemble electronic components and wiring according to blueprints and assembly drawings.

Other titles

The following job titles also refer to marine electronics technician:

marine electrical operator
marine electrical operative
maritime electronics installer
marine instrument mechanic
marine electronics installer
marine electronic mechanic
maritime electronics design technician
maritime electronics wiring technician
marine instrument inspector
marine electrical mechanic
maritime electronic networks technician
marine line inspector
marine instrument operator
marine electrical technician
marine instrument operative
marine electronic systems technician
maritime electronics repair technician
marine electronics installation technician
marine inspector
marine electronics wiring technician
maritime electronic systems technician
maritime electronics installation technician
marine electronics repair technician
marine electrical supervisor
marine electronics design technician
marine electronic networks technician

Minimum qualifications

A high school diploma is generally the minimum required to work as a marine electronics technician.

ISCO skill level

ISCO skill level is defined as a function of the complexity and range of tasks and duties to be performed in an occupation. It is measured on a scale from 1 to 4, with 1 the lowest level and 4 the highest, by considering:

  • the nature of the work performed in an occupation in relation to the characteristic tasks and duties
  • the level of formal education required for competent performance of the tasks and duties involved and
  • the amount of informal on-the-job training and/or previous experience in a related occupation required for competent performance of these tasks and duties.

Marine electronics technician is a Skill level 2 occupation.

Marine electronics technician career path

Similar occupations

These occupations, although different, require a lot of knowledge and skills similar to marine electronics technician.

electronic equipment assembler
electromechanical equipment assembler
aircraft de-icer installer
electronic equipment inspector
motor vehicle parts assembler

Long term prospects

These occupations require some skills and knowledge of marine electronics technician. They also require other skills and knowledge, but at a higher ISCO skill level, meaning these occupations are accessible from a position of marine electronics technician with a significant experience and/or extensive training.

electronics engineering technician
automation engineering technician
electronics production supervisor
electromechanical engineering technician
electronics drafter

Essential knowledge and skills

Essential knowledge

This knowledge should be acquired through learning to fulfill the role of marine electronics technician.

  • Circuit diagrams: Read and comprehend circuit diagrams showing the connections between the devices, such as power and signal connections.
  • Electronic equipment standards: The national and international quality and safety standards and regulations with regards to the use and manufacture of electronic equipment and its components, such as semiconductors and printed circuit boards.
  • Electrical equipment regulations: The national and international regulations with regards to the use and manufacture of electrical equipment on the workfloor. These regulations provide rules and guidelines on topics such as general risk management, electrical equipment manufacture, electrical equipment testing, electrical equipment installation, warning labels, and certificates.
  • Integrated circuits: Electronic components, made up from a set of electronic circuits which are placed on semiconductor material, such as silicon. Integrated circuits (IC) can hold billions of electronic components on a microscale and are one of basic components of electronic devices.
  • Mechanics of vessels: The mechanics involved in boats and ships. Understand the technicalities and participate in discussions over related topics in order to solve problems related to the mechanics.
  • Types of electronics: The different categories of electronics, such as consumer electronics, medical devices, microelectronics, computers, information and communication equipment, and measuring equipment.
  • Types of maritime vessels: Know a large variety of maritime vessels and their characteristics and specifications. Use that knowledge to ensure that all security, technical, and maintenance measures are taken into account in their supply.
  • Printed circuit boards: Printed circuit boards (PCB) are essential components to almost all electronic devices. They consist of thin wafers or substrates on which electronic components, such as microchips, are placed. The electronic components are electrically connected through conductive tracks and pads.
  • Electronics: The functioning of electronic circuit boards, processors, chips, and computer hardware and software, including programming and applications. Apply this knowledge to ensure electronic equipment runs smoothly.
  • Mechanics: Theoretical and practical applications of the science studying the action of displacements and forces on physical bodies to the development of machinery and mechanical devices.

Essential skills and competences

These skills are necessary for the role of marine electronics technician.

  • Apply soldering techniques: Apply and work with a variety of techniques in the process of soldering, such as soft soldering, silver soldering, induction soldering, resistance soldering, pipe soldering, mechanical and aluminium soldering.
  • Use water navigation devices: Utilise water navigation devices, e.g. compass or sextant, or navigational aids such as lighthouses or buoys, radar, satellite, and computer systems, in order to navigate vessels on waterways. Work with recent charts/maps, notices, and publications in order to determine the precise position of a vessel.
  • Solder electronics: Operate and use soldering tools and soldering iron, which supply high temperatures to melt the solder and to join electronic components.
  • Read assembly drawings: Read and interpret drawings listing all the parts and subassemblies of a certain product. The drawing identifies the different components and materials and provides instructions on how to assemble a product.
  • Assemble electronic units: Assemble and maintain electronic components and electronic circuits.
  • Align components: Align and lay out components in order to put them together correctly according to blueprints and technical plans.
  • Clean components during assembly: Clean components before fixing them to other compounds or units of components during the assembly process.
  • Fasten components: Fasten components together according to blueprints and technical plans in order to create subassemblies or finished products.
  • Apply health and safety standards: Adhere to standards of hygiene and safety established by respective authorities.

Optional knowledge and skills

Optional knowledge

This knowledge is sometimes, but not always, required for the role of marine electronics technician. However, mastering this knowledge allows you to have more opportunities for career development.

  • Electromechanics: The engineering processes that combine electrical and mechanical engineering in the application of electromechanics in devices that need electricity to create mechanical movement or devices that create electricity by mechanical movement.
  • Programmable logic controller: Programmable logic controllers or PLC’s are computer control systems used for the monitoring and control of input and output as well as the automation of electromechanical processes.
  • Power electronics: The functioning, design, and usage of electronics that control and convert electric power. Power conversion systems are usually categorised as AC-DC or rectifiers, DC-AC or inverters, DC-DC converters, and AC-AC converters.
  • Microprocessors: Computer processors on a microscale that integrate the computer central processing unit (CPU) on a single chip.
  • Defense system: The various weapons and weapon systems used to protect citizens and to harm or shield incoming enemies and enemy weapons.
  • Electricity: Understand the principles of electricity and electrical power circuits, as well as the associated risks.
  • Mechatronics: Multidisciplinary field of engineering that combines principles of electrical engineering, telecommunications engineering, control engineering, computer engineering, and mechanical engineering in the design of products and manufacturing processes. The combination of these areas of engineering allows for the design and development of “smart” devices and the achievement of an optimal balance between mechanical structure and control.
  • Computer technology: Computers, computer networks and other information technologies and equipment that can store, retrieve, transmit and manipulate data.
  • Automation technology: Set of technologies that make a process, system, or apparatus operate automatically through the use of control systems.

Optional skills and competences

These skills and competences are sometimes, but not always, required for the role of marine electronics technician. However, mastering these skills and competences allows you to have more opportunities for career development.

  • Install hardware: Assemble the necessary hardware components, such as the motherboard, Central Processing Unit (CPU), hard drive, disk drive, power supply unit, RAM, PCI card, mouse, keyboard, cameras and other necessary components to build the computer device. Attach the components manually using screwdrivers or use assembly machines and install the wiring.
  • Use diagnostic tools for electronic repairs: Use diagnostic equipment to measure current, resistance and voltage. Handle sophisticated multimeters to measure inductance, capacitance and current transistor gain.
  • Perform test run: Perform tests putting a system, machine, tool or other equipment through a series of actions under actual operating conditions in order to assess its reliability and suitability to realise its tasks, and adjust settings accordingly.
  • Assemble printed circuit boards: Attach electronic components to the printed circuit board through applying soldering techniques. Electronic components are placed in holes in through-hole assembly (THT), or are placed on the surface of PCB in surface-mount assembly (SMT).
  • Wear appropriate protective gear: Wear relevant and necessary protective gear, such as protective goggles or other eye protection, hard hats, safety gloves.
  • Install pneumatic systems: Install systems and components that use pneumatics to create mechanical movements such as air brakes, pneumatic cylinders, air compressors and other systems.
  • Calibrate electronic instruments: Correct and adjust the reliability of an electronic instrument by measuring output and comparing results with the data of a reference device or a set of standardised results. This is done in regular intervals which are set by the manufacturer and using calibration devices.
  • Maintain electronic systems: Calibrate and maintain electronic systems; execute preventive equipment maintenance tasks.
  • Check system parameters against reference values: Make sure that the measurable factors which define the operation of a system correspond to the predetermined norms.
  • Test electronic units: Test electronic units using appropriate equipment. Gather and analyse data. Monitor and evaluate system performance and take action if needed.
  • Liaise with engineers: Collaborate with engineers to ensure common understanding and discuss product design, development and improvement.
  • Install software: Install machine-readable instructions, such as computer programs, in order to direct the computer’s processor to perform a certain set of actions.
  • Keep records of work progress: Maintain records of the progress of the work including time, defects, malfunctions, etc.
  • Interpret technical information for electronic repair work: Analyse and understand given technical information for electronic repair work.
  • Repair electronic components: Repair, replace or adjust damaged electronics components or circuitry; use hand tools and soldering and welding equipment.
  • Build electronic prototypes: Construct prototypes from rough plans and sketches.

ISCO group and title

7421 – Electronics mechanics and servicers


References
  1. Marine electronics technician – ESCO
Last updated on October 11, 2022

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