Precision device inspector

Description

Precision device inspectors make sure precision devices, such as micrometers and gauges, operate according to design specifications. They may adjust the precision devices and their components in case of any faults.

Other titles

The following job titles also refer to precision device inspector:

inspector of precision instruments
precision device quality control supervisor
precision instrument QC inspector
precision instrument quality control inspector
precision device QC inspector
precision device quality assurance supervisor
precision device quality control inspector
inspector of precision devices
precision instrument inspector
precision instrument supervisor

Minimum qualifications

A high school diploma is generally required to work as a precision device inspector.

ISCO skill level

ISCO skill level is defined as a function of the complexity and range of tasks and duties to be performed in an occupation. It is measured on a scale from 1 to 4, with 1 the lowest level and 4 the highest, by considering:

  • the nature of the work performed in an occupation in relation to the characteristic tasks and duties
  • the level of formal education required for competent performance of the tasks and duties involved and
  • the amount of informal on-the-job training and/or previous experience in a related occupation required for competent performance of these tasks and duties.

Precision device inspector is a Skill level 2 occupation.

Precision device inspector career path

Similar occupations

These occupations, although different, require a lot of knowledge and skills similar to precision device inspector.

automated optical inspection operator
electronic equipment inspector
printed circuit board test technician
battery test technician
electrical equipment inspector

Long term prospects

These occupations require some skills and knowledge of precision device inspector. They also require other skills and knowledge, but at a higher ISCO skill level, meaning these occupations are accessible from a position of precision device inspector with a significant experience and/or extensive training.

computer hardware test technician
calibration technician
microelectronics engineering technician
microsystem engineering technician
commissioning technician

Essential knowledge and skills

Essential knowledge

This knowledge should be acquired through learning to fulfill the role of precision device inspector.

  • Quality assurance procedures: The procedures to inspect a product or system to ensure that it is according to specifications and requirements.
  • Precision engineering: Engineering discipline related to the fields of electrical engineering, electronics engineering, software engineering, optical engineering, and mechanical engineering that deals with the development of apparatus with very low tolerances.
  • Precision mechanics: Precision or fine mechanics is a subdiscipline in engineering that focuses on the design and development of smaller precision machines.
  • Quality standards: The national and international requirements, specifications and guidelines to ensure that products, services and processes are of good quality and fit for purpose.
  • Precision measuring instruments: Instruments used for precision measuring or manufacture, such as micrometers, calipers, gauges, scales, and microscopes.

Essential skills and competences

These skills are necessary for the role of precision device inspector.

Optional knowledge and skills

Optional knowledge

This knowledge is sometimes, but not always, required for the role of precision device inspector. However, mastering this knowledge allows you to have more opportunities for career development.

  • Circuit diagrams: Read and comprehend circuit diagrams showing the connections between the devices, such as power and signal connections.
  • Electrical engineering: Understand electrical engineering, a field of engineering that deals with the study and application of electricity, electronics, and electromagnetism.
  • Micromechatronic engineering: Cross-disciplinary engineering which focuses on the miniaturisation of mechatronic systems.
  • Microelectronics: Microelectronics is a subdiscipline of electronics and relates the study, design, and manufacture of small electronic components, such as microchips.
  • Moem: Micro-opto-electro-mechanics (MOEM) combines microelectronics, microoptics and micromechanics in the development of MEM devices with optical features, such as optical switches, optical cross-connects, and microbolometers.
  • Instrument performance elements: Elements that indicate or influence instrument performance. A first indication of the performance of the instrument is the accuracy or precision of the instrument, such as its response time, resolution, and range. A second indication of performance is the technical performance of the instrument, such as its power level, the electromagnetic interference, and transient voltages. A third indication of performance are environmental factors that can influence instrument performance, such as humidity, operating temperatures, or dust.
  • Waste removal regulations: Know and understand the regulations and legal agreements governing the performance of waste removal activities.
  • Microprocessors: Computer processors on a microscale that integrate the computer central processing unit (CPU) on a single chip.
  • Electronics: The functioning of electronic circuit boards, processors, chips, and computer hardware and software, including programming and applications. Apply this knowledge to ensure electronic equipment runs smoothly.
  • Mechanical engineering: Discipline that applies principles of physics, engineering and materials science to design, analyse, manufacture and maintain mechanical systems.
  • Microoptics: Optical devices with a size of 1 millimeter or smaller, such as microlenses and micromirrors.
  • Micromechanics: The design and production of micromechanisms. Micromechanisms combine mechanical and electrical components in a single device that is less than 1mm across.
  • Microelectromechanical systems: Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are miniaturised electromechanical systems made using processes of microfabrication. MEMS consist of microsensors, microactuators, microstructures, and microelectronics. MEMS can be used in a range of appliances, such as ink jet printer heads, digital light processors, gyroscopes in smart phones, accelerometers for airbags, and miniature microphones.

Optional skills and competences

These skills and competences are sometimes, but not always, required for the role of precision device inspector. However, mastering these skills and competences allows you to have more opportunities for career development.

  • Resolve equipment malfunctions: Identify, report and repair equipment damage and malfunctions; communicate with field representatives and manufacturers to obtain repair and replacement components.
  • Measure electrical characteristics: Measure voltage, current, resistance or other electrical characteristics by using electrical measuring equipment such as multimeters, voltmeters, and ammeters.
  • Remove defective products: Remove defective materials from the production line.
  • Operate precision measuring equipment: Measure the size of a processed part when checking and marking it to check if it is up to standard by use of two and three dimensional precision measuring equipment such as a caliper, a micrometer, and a measuring gauge.
  • Calibrate precision instrument: Examine the precision instruments and assess whether the instrument meets the quality standards and production specifications. Correct and adjust the reliability by measuring output and comparing results with the data of a reference device or a set of standardised results.
  • Calibrate electronic instruments: Correct and adjust the reliability of an electronic instrument by measuring output and comparing results with the data of a reference device or a set of standardised results. This is done in regular intervals which are set by the manufacturer and using calibration devices.
  • Research equipment needs: Research equipment or required machine parts; compare sources, prices and delivery times.
  • Maintain test equipment: Maintain equipment used for testing the quality of systems and products.
  • Use precision tools: Use electronic, mechanical, electric, or optical precision tools for precision work.
  • Check system parameters against reference values: Make sure that the measurable factors which define the operation of a system correspond to the predetermined norms.
  • Send faulty equipment back to assembly line: Send equipment that didn’t pass inspection back to the assembly line for re-assembly.
  • Keep records of work progress: Maintain records of the progress of the work including time, defects, malfunctions, etc.
  • Write inspection reports: Write the results and conclusions of the inspection in a clear and intelligible way. Log the inspection’s processes such as contact, outcome, and steps taken.
  • Operate precision machinery: Operate machinery used for the making of small systems or components with a high level of precision.
  • Write records for repairs: Write records of the repairs and maintenance interventions undertaken, of parts and materials used, and other repair facts.
  • Interpret electrical diagrams: Read and comprehend blueprints and electrical diagrams; understand technical instructions and engineering manuals for assembling electrical equipment; understand electricity theory and electronic components.

ISCO group and title

7543 – Product graders and testers (excluding foods and beverages)


References
  1. Precision device inspector – ESCO
Last updated on October 23, 2022

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