Toxicology

Description

The negative effects of chemicals on living organisms, their dose and exposure.

Alternative labels

study of toxicity
study of adverse effects of chemicals
studies of toxicity
chemical toxicity

Skill type

knowledge

Skill reusability level

cross-sector

Relationships with occupations

Essential knowledge

Toxicology is an essential knowledge of the following occupations:

Pharmacologist: Pharmacologists study the manner in which drugs and medicaments interact with organisms, living systems, and their parts (i.e. cells, tissues, or organs). Their research aims at identifying substances that can be ingested by humans and that exert adequate biochemical functions for curing illnesses.
Biomedical scientist: Biomedical scientists perform all laboratory methods required as part of medical examination, treatment and research activities, particularly clinical-chemical, haematological, immuno-haematological, histological, cytological, microbiological, parasitological, mycological, serological and radiological tests. They perform analytical sample testing and report the results to the medical staff for further diagnosis. Biomedical Scientists may apply these methods in particular in the infection, blood or cellular sciences.
Toxicologist: Toxicologists study the effects that chemical substances or biological and physical agents have in living organisms, more specifically, on the environment and on the animal and human health. They determine doses of the exposure to substances for arising toxic effects in environments, people, and living organisms, and also perform experiments on animals and cell cultures.
Industrial pharmacist: Industrial pharmacists are involved in the research and creation of medications. They develop new medicines, perform tests, assure quality and ensure that medication complies with regulations.
Hospital pharmacist: Hospital pharmacists prepare, dispense and provide medication to patients in hospitals. They collaborate with healthcare personnel such as doctors and nurses to treat patients and also offer advice and information on medications.
Pharmacist: Pharmacists prepare, dispense, and provide prescriptions for, over the counter medication. They offer clinical information on medicines, report suspected adverse reactions, and provide personalised support to patients. Pharmacists formulate and test medications in laboratories, and store, preserve, and distribute them.
Sensory scientist: Sensory scientists carry out sensory analysis in order to compose or improve flavours and fragrances for the food, beverage and cosmetics industry. They base their flavour and fragrance development on sensory and consumer research. Sensory scientists carry out research and analyse statistical data to meet customers expectations.
Specialist pharmacist: Specialist pharmacists provide specialist services for companies in the pharmacy industry and in hospital pharmacies.  The role of the specialist pharmacist varies throughout Europe, subject to national rules and training.
 
Biochemical engineer: Biochemical engineers research on the field of life science striving for new discoveries. They convert those findings into chemical solutions that can improve the wellbeing of society such as vaccines, tissue repair, crops improvement and green technologies advances such as cleaner fuels from natural resources.

Optional knowledge

Toxicology is optional for these occupations. This means knowing this knowledge may be an asset for career advancement if you are in one of these occupations.

Chemist: Chemists perform laboratory research by testing and analysing the chemical structure of substances.They translate the research results into industrial production processes which are further used in the development or improvement of products. Chemists are also testing the quality of the manufactured products and their environmental impact.
Anatomical pathology technician: Anatomical pathology technicians assist specialised doctors in pathology in conducting post-mortem examinations, keeping records of the samples, specimens, organs and the respective findings and taking care of their appropriate disposal under supervision, following the orders of the doctor of medicine.
Pharmacy lecturer: Pharmacy lecturers are subject professors, teachers, or lecturers who instruct students who have obtained an upper secondary education diploma in their own specialised field of study, pharmacy, which is predominantly academic in nature. They work with their university research assistants and university teaching assistants
for the preparation of lectures and of exams, for leading laboratory practices, grading papers and exams and for leading review and feedback sessions for the students. They also conduct academic research in their field of pharmacy, publish their findings and liaise with other university colleagues.
Secondary school teacher: Secondary school teachers provide education to students, commonly children and young adults, in a secondary school setting. They are usually specialist subject teachers, who instruct in their own field of study. They prepare lesson plans and materials, monitor the students’ progress, assist individually when necessary and evaluate their knowledge and performance through assignments, tests and examinations.
Biochemist: Biochemists study and perform research on the reactions caused by chemicals in living organisms. This includes performing research for the development or improvement of chemical-based products (e.g. medicine) aimed at improving the health of living organisms and at better understanding their reactions.
Biochemistry technician: Biochemistry technicians provide technical assistance in researching, analysing and testing the reactions caused by chemicals in living organisms. They use laboratory equipment to help develop or improve chemical-based products and also collect and analyse data for experiments, compile reports and maintain laboratory stock.
Microbiologist: Microbiologists study and research the life forms, characteristics, and processes of microscopic organisms. They study microorganisms such as bacteria, protozoa, fungi, etc. in order to diagnose and counteract the effects that these microorganisms might have in animals, in the environment, in the food industry, or in the health care industry.
Biomedical scientist advanced: Biomedical scientists advanced undertake advanced translational research in the biomedical science field and perform as educators of their professions or as other professionals.
Pharmaceutical engineer: Pharmaceutical engineers design and develop technologies used in pharmaceutical research and drugs manufacture, advising the pharmaceutical manufacturing plants to maintain and operate those technologies and ensuring the customers` and workers` safety requirements are met. They may also be involved in the conception and design of pharmaceutical manufacturing plants and research centers.
Chemistry lecturer: Chemistry lecturers are subject professors, teachers, or lecturers who instruct students who have obtained an upper secondary education diploma in their own specialised field of study, chemistry, which is predominantly academic in nature. They work with their university research assistants and university teaching assistants
for the preparation of lectures and of exams, for leading laboratory practices, grading papers and for leading review and feedback sessions for the students. They also conduct academic research in their field of chemistry, publish their findings and liaise with other university colleagues.
Chemical engineer: Chemical engineers design and develop large-scale chemical and physical production processes and are involved in the entire industrial process required for transforming raw materials into products.
Biologist: Biologists study living organisms and life in its broader extent in combination with its environment. Through research, they strive to explain the functional mechanisms, interactions, and evolution of organisms.
Bioengineer: Bioengineers combine state of the art findings in the field of biology with engineering logics in order to develop solutions aimed at improving the well-being of society. They can develop improvement systems for natural resource conservation, agriculture, food production, genetic modification, and economic use.
Chemistry teacher secondary school: Chemistry teachers at secondary schools provide education to students, commonly children and young adults, in a secondary school setting. They are usually subject teachers, specialised and instructing in their own field of study, chemistry. They prepare lesson plans and materials, monitor the students’ progress, assist individually when necessary, and evaluate the students’ knowledge and performance on the subject of chemistry through assignments, tests and examinations.

 


 

References

  1. Toxicology – ESCO

 

Last updated on September 20, 2022

Thinking about your next career move?

Answer a few questions about your jobs and education, and we’ll give you suggestions about your best possible career move. It’s completely free!