Make strategic business decisions

Description

Analyse business information and consult directors for decision making purposes in a varied array of aspects affecting the prospect, productivity and sustainable operation of a company. Consider the options and alternatives to a challenge and make sound rational decisions based on analysis and experience.

Alternative labels

make tactical business decisions
pay per click
make strategic business choices
PPC

Skill type

skill/competence

Skill reusability level

cross-sector

Relationships with knowledge

Essential knowledge

Make strategic business decisions is essential to master the following knowledge:

Business strategy concepts

Optional knowledge

Make strategic business decisions is optional for the following skills, according to the role’s responsibility:

Decision support systems

Relationships with occupations

Essential knowledge

Make strategic business decisions is an essential knowledge of the following occupations:

Essential skill

Make strategic business decisions is an essential skill of the following occupations:

Branch manager: Branch managers are responsible for the management of all the affairs related with a company in a specific geographic region or business branch. They receive indications from the headquarters, and depending on the structure of the company, they aim to implement the strategy of the company while adapting it to the market where the branch operates. They envision management of employees, communications, marketing efforts, and follow up to results and objectives.
Mergers and acquisitions analyst: Mergers and acquisitions analysts oversee the execution of transactions for the purchase, sale, merger or takeover of companies. They negotiate and complete the deal on the client’s behalf, by working closely with lawyers and accountants. Mergers and acquisitions analysts conduct operational and legal risk assessments of a company, assess comparable companies in the market and help with the post-merger integration.
Business service manager: Business service managers are reponsible for the provision of professional services to companies. They organise the provision of services tailored to the needs of the client and liaise with clients to agree on the contractual obligations for both parties.
ICT business analysis manager: ICT business analysis managers identify areas where information system changes are needed to support business plans and monitor the impact in terms of change management. They contribute to the general ICT functional requirements of the business organisation. ICT business analysis managers analyse business needs and translate them into ICT solutions.
Business manager: Business managers are responsible for setting the objectives of the business unit of a company, creating a plan for the operations, and facilitating the achievement of the objectives and implementation of the plan together with employees of the segment and stakeholders. They keep an overview of the business, understand detailed information of the business unit and support the department, and make decisions based on the information at hand.
Insurance agency manager: Insurance agency managers coordinate and oversee the operations of an institution or a branch of an institution that offers insurance services. They provide clients with advice on insurance products.
Business analyst:
Business analysts research and understand the strategic position of businesses and companies in relation to their markets and their stakeholders. They analyse and present their views on how the company, from many perspectives, can improve its strategic position and internal corporate structure. They assess needs for change, communication methods, technology, IT tools, new standards and certifications.
Venture capitalist: Venture capitalists invest in young or small startup companies by providing private funding. They research potential markets and particular product opportunities to help business owners develop or expand a business. They provide business advice, technical expertise, and network contacts based on their experience and activities. They do not assume executive managerial positions within the company, but have a say in its strategic direction.
Market research analyst: Market research analysts collect the information gathered in the market research and study it to draw conclusions. They define the potential customers of a product, the target group and the way they can be reached. Market research analysts analyse the position of products in the market from different perspectives such as features, prices and competitors. They analyse cross selling and interdependencies between different products and their placement. Market research analysts prepare information helpful for the development of marketing strategies.
Business consultant: Business consultants analyse the position, structure and processes of businesses and companies and offer services or advice to improve them. They research and identify business processes such as financial inefficiencies or employee management and devise strategical plans to overcome these difficulties. They work in external consulting firms where they provide an objective view on a business and or company’s structure and methodological processes.
Chief executive officer: Chief executive officers hold the highest ranking in a pyramidal corporate structure. They are able to hold a complete idea of the functioning of the business, its departments, risks, and stakeholders. They analyse different kinds of information and create links among them for decision-making purposes. They serve as a  communication link with the board of directors for reporting and implementation of the overall strategy.
Bank manager: Bank managers oversee the management of one or several bank activities. They set policies which promote safe banking operations, ensure the economic, social and commercial targets are met and that all the bank departments, activities and commercial policies are in compliance with legal requirements. They also manage employees and maintain an effective working relationship among the staff.
Medical practice manager: Medical practice managers manage the day-to-day operations of a medical practice. They oversee the staff and business side of the practice.
Sales manager: Sales managers develop sales and targeting strategies for a company. They manage sales teams, allocate sales resources based on the plans, prioritise and follow up on critical leads, develop sales pitches and adjust them over time, and maintain a sales platform to track all leads and sales.
Risk manager: Risk managers identify and assess potential threats and risks to a company, and give advice on how to deal with them. They create preventive plans to avoid and reduce risks, and put plans in place for when the company is threatened.
Chief operating officer: Chief operating officers are the right hand and second in command of a company’s chief executive officer. They ensure that the daily operations of the company run smoothly. Chief operating officers also develop company policies, rules and goals.
Corporate banking manager: Corporate banking managers offer advice on a broad range of financial goods and services such as securities services, credit services, cash management, insurance products, leasing, information on merges and acquisitions and capital markets activities, to institutions and organisations.
Legal service manager: Legal service managers oversee the general management of a legal service office. They not only strive for the highest efficiency and effectiveness when delivering legal services and advice, but they also coordinate a team of legally trained professionals. They manage different profiles of clients and adjust the legal services to their needs.

Optional knowledge

Make strategic business decisions is optional for these occupations. This means knowing this knowledge may be an asset for career advancement if you are in one of these occupations.

Optional skill

Make strategic business decisions is optional for these occupations. This means knowing this skill may be an asset for career advancement if you are in one of these occupations.

Accounting manager: Accounting managers assume responsibility for all accounting activities relating to financial reporting. They develop and maintain accounting principles and procedures to ensure timely and accurate financial statements issued, supervise accounting staff and manage the accounting activities within the appropriate time frame and budget.
Financial auditor: Financial auditors collect and examine financial data for clients, organisations and companies. They ensure the financial data is properly maintained and free of material misstatements due to error or fraud, that it adds up, and functions legally and effectively. They review lending and credit policies or numbers in databases and documents, evaluate, consult and assist the source of the transaction if necessary. They use their review of the client’s financial governance as assurance to give testimony to the shareholders, stakeholders and board of directors of the organisation or company that all is up to par.
Business intelligence manager: Business intelligence managers gain knowledge of the industry, the innovative processes therein, and contrast them with the operations of the company in order to improve them. They focus their analysis in the supply chain processes, warehouses, storage, and sales as to facilitate communication and revenue improvement.
Corporate investment banker: Corporate investment bankers offer strategic advice on financial services to companies and other institutions. They ensure that legal regulations are being followed by their clients in their efforts of raising any capital. They provide technical expertise and information on mergers and acquisitions, bonds and shares, privatisations and reorganisation, raising capital and security underwriting, including equity and debt markets.
Financial manager: Financial managers handle all the matters in reference to the finance and investments of a company. They manage financial operations of companies such as the assets, liabilities, equity and cash flow aiming to maintain the financial health of the company and operative viability. Financial managers evaluate the strategic plans of the company in financial terms, maintain transparent financial operations for taxation and auditing bodies, and create the financial statements of the company at the end of the fiscal year.
Marketeer: Marketing consultants advise companies in the development of marketing strategies for specific purposes. They can advise and develop strategies for the entry of a brand in the market, for the re-launch of a product, for the introduction of a new product, or for the positioning of a commercial image. They perform previous studies of the position of the company and perception of customers in order to define the marketing approach.
Investor relations manager: Investor relations managers disseminate the investment strategy of the company and monitor the reactions of the investment community towards it. They use marketing, financial, communications, and security law expertise to ensure transparent communication to the larger community. They respond to inquiries from shareholders and investors in relation to the company’s financial stability, stocks, or corporate policies.
EBusiness manager: eBusiness managers create and execute a company’s electronic strategy plan for selling products and services online. They also improve data integrity, placement of online tools and brand exposure and monitor sales for companies that market products to customers using the internet. They collaborate with the marketing and sales management team using ICT tools to reach sales goals and provide accurate information and offerings to business partners.
Tax advisor: Tax advisors use their expertise in tax legislation to provide commercially-focused advisory and consultancy services to a wide range of clients from all economic sectors. They explain complicated tax-related legislation to their clients and assist them in ensuring the most efficient and beneficial payment of taxes by devising tax-efficient strategies. They also inform them of fiscal changes and developments and may specialise in tax strategies concerning mergers or multinational reconstruction for business clients, trust and estate taxes for individual clients etc.
Policy manager: Policy managers are responsible for managing the development of policy programs and ensuring that the strategic objectives of the organization are met. They oversee the production of policy positions, as well as the organization’s campaign and advocacy work in fields such as environmental, ethics, quality, transparency, and sustainability.
Marketing manager: Marketing managers carry out the implementation of efforts related to the marketing operations in a company. They develop marketing strategies and plans by detailing cost and resources needed. They analyse the profitability of these plans, develop pricing strategies, and strive to raise awareness on products and companies among targeted customers.
Client relations manager:
Client relations managers act as the middle person between a company and its customers. They ensure that the customers are satisfied by providing them with guidance and explanation on their accounts and services received by the company. They also have possible other tasks such as developing plans or delivering proposals.
Department manager: Department managers are responsible for the operations of a certain division or department of a company. They ensure objectives and goals are reached and manage employees.
Service manager: Service managers are responsible for the supervision and coordination of the provision of different professional and technical services to customers. They ensure a smooth interaction with clients and high levels of satisfaction post-service. This occupation includes the provision of policing, correctional, library, legal and fire services.
Banking products manager: Banking products managers study the market of banking products and adapt the existing ones to the characteristics of this evolution or create new products to suit clients needs. They monitor and evaluate the performance indicators of these products and suggest improvements. Banking products managers assist with the sales and marketing strategy of the bank.
Telecommunications analyst: Telecommunications analysts review, analyse and evaluate an organisation’s telecommunications needs and systems. They provide training on the telecommunications system features and functionalities.
Operations manager: Operations managers plan, oversee and coordinate the daily operations of production of goods and provision of services. They also formulate and implement company policies and plan the use of human resources and materials.
Programme manager: Programme managers coordinate and oversee several projects working simultaneously. They ensure workability and compatibility among projects ensuring that overall, each one of the projects under the management of project managers, turn out profitable and leveraging one to the other.
Accounting analyst: Accounting analysts evaluate the financial statements of clients, usually companies, which include the income sheet, the balance sheet, the statement of cash flows and additional notes to other financial statements. They interpret and implement new accounting systems and accounting procedures and will analyse and determine if the proposed systems conform to accounting regulations and meet user information requirements.
Audit supervisor: Audit supervisors oversee audit staff, planning and reporting, and review the audit staff’s automated audit work papers to ensure compliance with the company’s methodology. They prepare reports, evaluate general auditing and operating practices, and communicate findings to the superior management.
Dividend analyst: Dividend analysts calculate and allocate dividends and interest incomes of a company’s earnings to a category of its shareholders. They assess business systems and processes in order to identify user needs and to deliver appropriate solutions. They also undertake dividend forecasts on amounts and payment schedules and identify potential risks, based on their financial and market price expertise.

 


 

References

  1. Make strategic business decisions – ESCO

 

Last updated on September 21, 2022

Thinking about your next career move?

Answer a few questions about your jobs and education, and we’ll give you suggestions about your best possible career move. It’s completely free!